MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

All forms of muscular dystrophy are caused by gene defects. Individuals with muscular dystrophy usually exhibit contractures, a condition often associated with shortened muscles around the joints. Due to the abnormal and sometimes painful positioning of the joints, most individuals have extreme fatigue and weakness as well as speech, mobility, and fine motor limitations. In addition, scoliosis, or curvature of the spine, is common). Muscular dystrophy is generally inherited but in some cases no family history of the disease may exist. It can affect people of all ages.

While some forms first become apparent in infancy or childhood, others may not appear until middle age or later.

MD is a list of medical conditions that constitute disabilities. It is necessary to assess general definition of disability that each person must meet. A person has a disability if he/she has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, a record of such impairment, or is regarded as having impairment. For more information about MD please refer to RPD ACT.

Accommodating Students with Muscular Dystrophy (source: www.askjan.org)

 

People with muscular dystrophy may develop some of the limitations discussed below, but seldom develop all of them. Also, the degree of limitation will vary among individuals. Be aware that not all people with muscular dystrophy will need accommodations to perform their jobs and many others may only need a few accommodations. The following is only a sample of the possibilities available. Numerous other accommodation solutions may exist.

Questions to Consider:

 

  1. What limitations is the student experiencing?

  2. How do these limitations affect the student and the student’s performance?

  3. What specific job tasks are problematic as a result of these limitations?

  4. What accommodations are available to reduce or eliminate these problems? Are all possible resources being used to determine possible accommodations?

  5. Has the student been consulted regarding possible accommodations?

  6. Once accommodations are in place, would it be useful to meet with the student to evaluate the effectiveness of the accommodations and to determine whether additional accommodations are needed?

  7. Do supervisory personnel and students need training?

ABOUT MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

Muscular dystrophy refers to a group of genetic diseases marked by progressive weakness and degeneration of the skeletal, or voluntary, muscles, which control movement.

 The muscles of the heart and some other involuntary muscles are also affected in some forms of muscular dystrophy, and a few forms involve other organs as well. The major forms of muscular dystrophy are myotonic, Duchenne, Becker, limb-girdle, facioscapulohumeral, congenital, oculopharyngeal, distal, and Emery-Dreifuss.

PersonwithMuscularDystrophy.jpg

Accommodation Idea, (Source: AskJan.org)

 

By Limitation of Decreased Stamina / Fatigue

 
  • Accessories for Scooters

  • Aide/Assistant/Attendant

  • All-Terrain Scooters

  • Anti-fatigue Matting

  • Elevating Wheelchairs

  • Ergonomic and Pneumatic Tools

  • Ergonomic Assessments

  • Ergonomic Equipment

  • Examination and Procedures Chair

  • Flexible Schedule

  • Head Support for Wheelchairs

  • Job Restructuring

  • Low Task Chair

  • Mechanic's Seats and Creepers

  • Multi-Purpose Carts

  • Periodic Rest Breaks

  • Scooters

  • Stand-lean Stools

  • Stools for Cutting Hair

  • Telework, Work from Home, Working Remotely

  • Walkers

  • Wearable Anti-fatigue Matting

  • Wheelchair Accessible Scales

  • Wheelchair Mounts

  • Wheelchairs

  • Worksite Redesign / Modified Workspace

By Limitation of Effect of / Receive Medical Treatment

ACCESSING COMPUTERS

 
  • Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC) Device

  • Flexible Schedule

  • Outgoing Voice Amplification – Telephone

  • Personal On-Site Paging Devices

  • Protective Eyewear

  • Telework, Work from Home, Working Remotely

  • Voice Amplification

By Limitation of Feeling / Sensing

 
  • Aide/Assistant/Attendant

  • Periodic Rest Breaks

  • Task Rotation

By Limitation of Stress Intolerance

 
  • Apps for Anxiety and Stress 

  • Behaviour Modification Techniques

  • Counselling/Therapy

  • Environmental Sound Machines / Tinnitus Maskers / White Noise Machines

  • Flexible Schedule

  • Job Restructuring

  • Marginal Functions

  • Modified Break Schedule

  • Supervisory Methods

  • Support Animal

  • Support Person

By Limitation of Toileting / Grooming Issue

 
  • Accessible Toilets and Toilet Seats

  • Aide/Assistant/Attendant

  • Flexible Schedule

  • Grab Bars - Toilet Hinged Arm Support

  • Grooming and Dressing Aids

  • Independent Living Aids

  • Modified Break Schedule

  • Swing Away Grab Bars

  • Telework, Work from Home, Working Remotely 

  • Toileting Aids

  • Transfer Aids

  • Transfer Sheets

  • Worksite Redesign / Modified Workspace

By Limitation of Walking

 
  • Accessories for Scooters

  • Aide/Assistant/Attendant

  • All-Terrain Scooters

  • All-Terrain Wheelchairs

  • Anti-fatigue Matting

  • Boat Access

  • Ergonomic and Pneumatic Tools

  • Examination and Procedures Chair

  • Foldable / Transport Wheelchairs

  • Head Support for Wheelchairs

  • Large-Rated Scooters

  • Large-Rated Wheelchairs

  • Low Task Chair

  • Personal Transportation and Mobility Products

  • Reclining Wheelchairs

  • Rollators and Rolling Walkers

  • Scooters

  • Scooters for Small Stature

  • Stair Assists

  • Stools for Cutting Hair

  • Telework, Work from Home, Working Remotely

  • Van Conversion

  • Walkers

  • Walkers for Tall Individuals

  • Walkers with Seats

  • Wearable Anti-fatigue Matting

  • Wheelchair Accessible Scales

  • Wheelchair Carts/Trailers

  • Wheelchair Mounts

  • Wheelchairs

  • Wheelchairs for Small Stature

  • Worksite Redesign / Modified Workspace

By Limitation of Work Related Functions - Commute

 
  • Flexible Schedule

  • Ride Sharing/Carpooling

  • Telework, Work from Home, Working Remotely

  • Transportation Assistance

  • Van Conversion

  • Walkers

By Limitation of Work Related Functions - Parking

 
  • Accessible Parking Space

  • Flexible Schedule 

  • Telework, Work from Home, Working Remotely

  • Wheelchairs

By Limitation of Work Related Functions - Work Site Access

 
  • Accessible Toilets and Toilet Seats

  • Accessories for Scooters

  • Adjustable Workstations for Industrial Settings

  • Adjustable Workstations for Office Settings

  • All-Terrain Scooters

  • Anti-fatigue Matting

  • Automatic Door Openers

  • Boat Access

  • Braille and/or ADA Signage

  • Door Knob Grips and Handles

  • Examination and Procedures Chair

  • Flexible Schedule

  • Head Support for Wheelchairs

  • High Visibility Floor Tape and Paint

  • Low Task Chair

  • Portable Ramps

  • Ramps

  • Scooters

  • Service Anima 

  • Smart Locks/Key less Entry Locks

  • Stair Assists

  • Stair Tread/Textured Tape

  • Support Animal

  • Telework, Work from Home, Working Remotely

  • Van Conversion

  • Walkers 

  • Wearable Anti-fatigue Matting

  • Wheelchair Accessible Scales

  • Wheelchair Carts/Trailers

  • Wheelchair Lifts

  • Wheelchair Mounts

  • Wheelchairs

  • Worksite Redesign / Modified Workspace

SITUATIONS AND SOLUTIONS:
  1. A student with muscular dystrophy was having difficulty with daily living needs. The individual was allowed to bring her mother to school.

  2. A student with muscular dystrophy was having problems getting up from a seated position. The individual was accommodated with a lift cushion for his chair.

  3. A student with muscular dystrophy was restricted from typing information into her computer due to fine motor limitations. She was accommodated with speech recognition.

  4. An engineering student with muscular dystrophy had difficulty grasping frequently used files. He was accommodated with a desktop carousel.

  5. A student with muscular dystrophy was having difficulty reaching her computer screen. The individual was accommodated with a flat screen monitor, monitor arm, keyboard tray, footrest, headset, and strategically placed filing racks.

  6. A student with muscular dystrophy who operated a power chair with a joystick was having difficulty opening doors. The individual could not grasp door handles and was accommodated with automatic door openers.

  7. A student with muscular dystrophy was limited in her use of the computer. She was accommodated with a miniature computer keyboard and mouse. The keyboard worked with the slightest touch and no force was needed to activate the keys.

  8. A teacher with muscular dystrophy was having difficulty climbing stairs. He was accommodated with a stair lift.